I believe that the main reason why music plays such an important rule in fights for migrant justice lies in the accessibility of music itself. When Minu sings, his lyrics often focus on the plight that migrant workers felt, announcing that “[w]e [the migrant workers] make Korea” or belated paychecks (“Coming to you, Minu Trailer”). As Professor Matsumura says, there was a disparity in the social conditions experienced by Nepali migrant workers between their status at home and in Korea. In Nepal, these migrant workers were relatively well-off and enjoyed middle-class lifestyles, while in Korea they were ostracized by both…

Kwon’s article shows how immigration policies and the treatment of immigrants by a country exposes their adverse effects on family relationships. For example, Kwon points out that “[t]hose who remain at home feel displaced and marginalized, as their surroundings change rapidly due to remittance-driven development” (479). Indeed, “Korean Chinese face the implementation of a restrictive entry policy by the Korean governmen (Kwon 479). Arguably, the anxiety of waiting is largely driven by uncertainty of the fate of their family members in a foreign land, but this feeling of being reliant on someone afar without an option to help them in…

I believe that the way Okinawan women resisted U.S. military occupation was caused by a blur in traditional gender roles and solidarity between women during the Battle of Okinawa. As the situation deteriorated on Okinawa, women began to assume traditional roles, such as becoming laborers and farmers, that had held by men to supplement the loss of men during the World War Two (Matsumura, Lecture 6). While — as we will see later this synthesis of gender roles did not completely break down the traditional gender dynamic of Okinawan communities, the hardships experienced by Okinawan women in taking on both…

I think a great example of this topic(and one I’m intimately familiar with) is the controversy surrounding a ‘Taiwanese’ identity. There is an intense debate over whether a ‘Taiwanese’ identity truly exists, and if it does, when it precisely developed as a cultural or national consciousness. Personally, I’d argue that the development of a distinct ‘Taiwanese’ identity started under Imperial Japanese rule. Songs like “Bāng Chhun-hong” and “Ú-iā-hue” were created and popularized under the looming gaze of Imperial rule. What is interesting about these songs is that the songs themselves do not express any explicit political commentary on Japanese Imperial…

I think that the most relevant and prevalent effects of the militarization of Okinawan society and subsequent spy-labelling is the erosion of the indigenous Okinawan/Ryukyu identity and individual agency. In terms of Japanizing the Okinawan islands and its people, “the goal was not simply the national identity of ‘the Japanese’ but the ideal home life as well” (Tomiyama 127). This meant a total suppression of all aspects of “everyday life” of the Okinawan society, including “the Okinawan language, bare feet, pig toilets, graves, bone washing, sexual play (moashibi), songs on the sanshin, celebrations, hygiene problems, and tardiness (Tomiyama 124). …

I believe that Kawashima fixates on the role played by the Soaikai in suppressing Korean workers because it showed that colonial oppression and exploitation — while ultimately deriving from the state — can be channeled and enacted by actors across a racial-capitalist society. Indeed, rather than the “cut-and-dried oppositions between state power and marginalized, colonial minorit[ies,]” Kawashima invites us to think about how the Japanese government was able to effectively utilize the Soaikai as both its conduit for colonial oppression, and a distraction which could divert attention away from the very activities of the government itself (467). First, we need…

I believe that the impetus behind many Koreans’s decision to adopt active resistance against Imperial Japan was the oppressive colonial policies imposed upon the Korean people. The Japanese government played an active role in facilitating the exploitation of Korean people. For example, the government actively subsidizing Japanese corporations to monopolize Korean lands (particularly fertile agricultural land), thus depriving the livelihood of their original Korean inhabitants and in a sense, commodifying desperate and jobless Koreans into an easily exploitable labor population that is bound by wage-slavery. The Japanese government also actively suppressed expressions of Korean culture in an attempt to assimilate…

To preface, I believe that sound and soundscape as mentioned in our prompt doesn’t merely refer to literal definition of sound — that is, vibrations throughout the air — but also describes figurative noises generated by actions and reactions. By paying attention to soundscapes surrounding us, we can discover how relationships are broken and forged under a capitalist framework.

In British Jamaica, capitalism was able to bring both conflict and unity to the island’s Chinese and Jamaican communities. British settler-colonialism saw a minority of white British plantation owners using black Jamaican labor for profit. The British had already sought to…

I believe that the reasons why Liang Qichao and He Zhen developed their politics abroad is twofold. On one hand, increased crackdown of seditious politics by the Qing government left little room for discussion in a domestic environment. On the other hand, going abroad could provide these thinkers exposure to foreign perspectives of China and new modes of thought as well. For example, He Yi Zhen followed an anarcho-feminist line of thinking which could not be found within China. She also drew parallels between the enslavement of women in China and chattel slavery under European and American imperialism. The aforementioned…

According to Saranillio, settler-colonialism ultimately depends on an imperial power erase and replace the “modes of production” of established populations and said populations themselves that previously inhabited an area of land with another population who are “superior and thus more deserving” of said land (284). Despite the Chinese and Japanese themselves being immigrants to Hawaii, it is through an understanding of this concept that we see how the history of Hawaii is inextricably linked with the United States’s strategy to disenfranchise the aforementioned peoples, Native Hawaiian, and other established populations by gradually co-opting and monopolizing the local economy and land…

Bolton Chou

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